Yamaha TTR 110E Full Review – What Kids Dirt Bike to Buy


This is our review of the Yamaha TTR 110E dirt bike. We all know that Yamaha makes some of the best selling kids bikes that are on the market.

In fact if you talk to most riders out there including pros they’ll probably tell you that they started on a Yamaha PW50 and then worked their way up from there and in this article we’re taking a look at the Yamaha TTR 110E.

The Yamaha TTR 110E is a great transition bike from a PW50. With some key features for learning new skills, its ideal before they make that next step.

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This review is part of a complete blog series to help you understand which one is going to be best for your youth rider. You can view all the reviews here

CONTENT
What is a Yamaha TTR 110E?
What Age and Size is a TTR 110E For?
How much does a TTR 110 cost?
Tips and Tricks for the TTR 110E
Yamaha TTR 110 Specifications

In a hurry? If you don’t have much time use the links below to quickly find the Best kids bikes and accessories discussed on Amazon. You can be assured we only choose the best products…
Yamaha TTR 110E – 
Fuel Stabilizer
Tusk Cold Start Jet Kit – 
Tusk Folding Shift Lever – 
Tusk Brake Lever – 

What is a Yamaha TTR 110E?

They started making the TTR 110 back in 2008 and still make them today. It’s a 110 CC, dual valve, four-stroke engine. Its a really smooth engine but has plenty of torque and plenty of power for those youth riders.

It’s a four speed bike and first gear is pretty low. Therefore it’s going to be better for that slow technical riding and it’s also got no clutch which is something that I really like about the TTR 110.

I’d say it’s a really good transition bike from a PW50, going from a fully auto bike into a manual bikes where you’ve actually got to use a clutch when you shift.

One thing I would note about these bikes is something that we’ve kind of noticed during use and that’s the shifting on these is a little bit difficult. If you have a youth rider who’s having a hard time shifting up, just know that with these 110’s that’s something they’re known for.

Other than that you get a real smooth power motor and they are proven to be reliable, they go forever.

The TTR 110 is an electric start and also comes with a kick starter as a backup. They start up real nice and easy.

You’re also going have a key to ignition which is great as you can ensure the bike can’t be used without you there. If you don’t want junior taking off on one of these without you around, you can just take the key right out of the ignition and it wont start.

Fuel capacity on the TTR 110 is up to 1 gallon, so plenty of fuel to keep them going for a while when out on the trails.

What Age and Size is a TTR 110E For?

Who is this bike for size-wise? That’s probably the biggest factor that you need to consider when you’re picking up a youth bike.

BIKESEAT HEIGHT
YAMAHA PW5018.7″
YAMAHA TTR-90E24.6″
YAMAHA PW8025″
YAMAHA TTR 100E26.4″
HONDA CRF 125F28.9″
YAMAHA TTR-125LE31.7″

The TTR 110 sits at 26.4″ tall and that’s more than 5″ taller than a PW50. It’s a little bit taller than a TTR 90 or the PW80. When you go from the 110 up to the TTL 125 thats another 4″ taller, so there’s a big jump from the 110 to 125.

If you were looking for a bike that’s going to fit right in the middle of those you can see from the chart the Honda CRF 125F is just over 28″ so it sits right between the two.

In general terms this bike is going to fit a youth rider under 12 years old but to help with size and age comparison, I’ve used a couple of my kids as youth riders. I’ll give you there age and height so that you can use it as a reference as to what size rider or age is going to be a good fit.

The first is my son Bobby who’s 8 years old and he’s 4 foot 3 inches tall. When he hops on I can see he’s going to be a little bit too small for this bike right now.

At 4 foot 3 inches his feet are not able to touch the ground so the TTR 110 bike would be just a little bit too big for him but in a couple years it would be a much better fit.

Next my daughter Olivia has helped me out. She’s 10 years old and she is 4 foot 7 inches. With Olivia I can see she’s actually able to just get both her feet on the ground and she’s able to balance herself.

I’d say she is really in that that sweet spot when it comes to the bike size and this is definitely a bike that she’s going to be able to have for a couple of years and grow into it.

Also when she put her feet on the teeth of the foot pegs I could see it really is a good fitment. Again Olivia is ten years old and four feet seven inches tall.

This should just give you a really good idea of age range and height that’s going to be ideal for this TTR 110.

How much does a TTR 110 cost?

Price wise you’re going to be right around $2,300 for a new one but you can also pick up second hand pretty easily.

Since they were first made they really haven’t changed a whole lot, so if you can save yourself money and find one that’s four or five years old and in good shape, you’ll be onto a winner.

We did a little research on the internet and found these reasonably quickly:

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Tips and Tricks for the TTR 110E

Now we want to give you some tips and insights that are really going to help get the most out of these bikes and also help them run well.

The first thing we have to talk about is with the carburetor. Just like any other bike, but especially on these smaller bikes the Jets are really small and if you leave it sitting for too long, say a month or more, it’s really easy for those Jets to gunk up.

If you are going to be letting it sit, i’d definitely use a fuel stabilizer. What you should do is drain or run the carburetor dry, that way you’re not going to gunk the jets up. If you don’t do that, chances are that all you’d be doing is just cleaning out your jets and cleaning up the carburetor over and over again and after some time this becomes a right hassle.

Along with the carburetor when it comes to the jetting on the 110’s, the stock jetting is pretty lean and when you have a lean jetting , typically what that means is that in colder temperatures it can be harder to start the bike.

It will also take a long time for the bike to warm up. These are air-cooled machines and are most definitely cold blooded so for that what we actually did was replace with a Tusk cold starter jet kit.

It’s a kit that comes with a different size mane and pilot jet that makes it much easier for the bikes to start up and run in cold weather. It will help them warm up faster and if you’re having that problem yourselves this is something I would look at.

The cold start jet kit is very easy to install and you can grab the one we used here on amazon.

Next for us would be the shift lever. The stock shift lever on these are not folding, so if your youth rider has a crash or tip over they’re pretty easy to bend.

We replace these with the Tusk folding shift lever. These are folding and if they do fall over it’s just going to fold out of the way, it’s not going to be damaged.

Your brake levers are another item that will bend or break pretty easily when they have a tip over. We’ve replaced these with the Tusk brake lever.

What we’d recommend is picking up a couple and then that way if they do break one you have another one available you can just put it on real quick. You can grab the Tusk brake levers here on amazon.

One other thing that we wanted to point out with this bike is that the spring is pretty stiff and it’s not adjustable.

The reason that we think it is such a stiff spring is Yamaha knows that this is a very popular bike for youth riders but it’s also a very popular play bike so there’s a lot of older riders on them too.

When we picked up our TTR 110 it was in a well used condition, so cosmetically I wanted to freshen it up give it a cool look for a youth rider.

The first thing we did is we put a QA parts plastic kit on. You can get these in a couple of different colors and unlike any other plastic kit on the market for these bikes the one we got the front fender did fit!

On top of that we put a custom attack graphics kit on. You can get the exact same kit as ours on the Rocky Mountain Website. Youth riders love having customized graphics kits on their bikes and you can get their name and the number here.

From there we did some ODI grips and put a crossbar pad on. Then to top it off we added some valve stem covers just to give it a little bit of bling and give it that cool look.

Lastly and with all our bikes we like to look at something that we think is pretty overlooked with youth bikes and that’s the tires.

We’ve got some new Dunlop tires on ours and the reason that we feel new tires are really important is because of our kids safety. When riders are out there and they’re learning to ride and you want them to have as much traction on the bike as possible.

If you have old tires that are pretty worn out it’s easy for those to break loose and have your kids fall over or crash. We highly recommend getting some new tires and you can grab the Dunlop set we use here.

Yamaha TTR 110 Specifications

Engine

Engine TypeAir-cooled, 4-stroke, SOHC
Displacement110 cc
Bore x Stroke51.0 x 54.0 mm
Compression Ratio9.3 : 1
Lubrication SystemWet sump
Fuel ManagementVM16
IgnitionDC – CDI
Starter SystemElectric/Kick
Fuel Tank Capacity4 L
Oil Capacity1 L
Transmission4-speed

Dimensions

Length1565 mm
Width680 mm
Height923 mm
Seat Height670 mm
Wheelbase1080 mm
Ground Clearance180 mm
Dry Weight68 kg
Wet Weight72 kg with 4 litres of fuel

Chassis

Suspension FrontTelescopic fork
Suspension RearSwingarm (monocross)
Brakes FrontDrum
Brakes RearDrum
Tyres Front2.50-14-4PR
Tyres Rear3.00-12-4PR

That is our bike overview for the TTR 110 from Yamaha and don’t forget that this is part of a series that we’re writing looking at a lot of youth bikes that we’ve used or are out there.

All shall hopefully help you know which one’s going to be best for your little rider and how to get the most out of these bikes. You can view all the reviews here.

To pick up any of the parts and accessories that we talked about click on the links within the article above. Please note these are affiliate links and we are compensated for referring traffic and business to Amazon and other companies linked too on this site.

The Warburton Family

Everything we write is tried and tested. We research everything before putting it out to the world. Thanks for reading :-)

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